11 Sep

Dr. Steven Jones's paper reveals that the initial bright yellow-white glow of the expelled liquid was consistent with a glowing stream of molten iron from "a nearby thermite reaction zone," and the expected white smoke (aluminum oxide off-gassing) supports that conclusion.

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11 Sep

A prime example of a non-insider whistleblower would be Kevin Ryan, the chemistry laboratory manager for the environmental testing division of Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL), who began to investigate 9/11 and publicly ask questions about UL’s testing of the structural assemblies used to construct the World Trade Center towers as well as UL’s involvement in the WTC investigation being conducted by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). UL fired Ryan in 2004.

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11 Sep

The live video footage of the 'collapse' of WTC 7 undermines the credibility of NIST and their black-box computer simulation.

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11 Sep

The problem is that Silverstein's "pull it" comment is so cryptic and vague that it is impossible to know for sure what he was referring to.

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11 Sep

Airplane impact tests conducted by WTC structural engineers in 1964, during the design of the Twin Towers, calculated that the towers would handle the impact of a Boeing 707 traveling at 600 mph without collapsing. Technical comparisons show that the 707 has more destructive force at cruising speed than the 767, the aircraft said to be used in the 9/11 attacks.

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11 Sep

9/11 researcher Kevin Ryan has shown that there is substantial documentation detailing how nano-thermite has been formulated to be explosive.

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11 Sep

The thermal tests on the red-gray chips revealed that when they are ignited at around 430ºC, they create molten iron microspheres as a byproduct. Since iron does not melt until it reaches approximately 1538ºC, this means that a high-temperature chemical reaction occurred. Such volatile reactivity makes this type of material extremely dangerous, disqualifying it from ever being used as primer paint.

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11 Sep

Those who question a premise simply because the number of adherents of that premise is deemed too small are engaging in a logical fallacy often referred to as an "appeal to majority."

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