The effort by Geoff Campbell’s family to secure a new inquest into his death in the World Trade Center on 9/11 continued to gain traction today when Geoff’s brother Matt was interviewed on BBC Radio Sussex, the Campbells’ local BBC station.

Matt’s interview with host Allison Ferns follows on the heels of last month’s feature article in The Daily Mail, Britain’s second-largest tabloid newspaper.

The interview aired three separate times during the four-hour morning show. In the second segment, Ferns also interviewed Ian Henshall, head of Britain’s leading 9/11 Truth group, Reinvestigate 9/11.

All three segments are now available as a stand-alone video below.


First Segment

Anchor:

This is John with your roundup for Wednesday on BBC Radio Sussex. A Sussex family are calling for a fresh inquest into how their loved one died on 9/11, 20 years ago. Geoff Campbell perished when the two hijacked planes were flown into the twin towers in New York. Despite official reports categorically stating otherwise, his brother Matt believes it was a controlled demolition explosive, not the planes, that brought the building down. He says a new inquest is needed to challenge official accounts.

Matt Campbell:

You're never really going to get to know the entire truth about 9/11, but I do hope that this action through the inquest will start to open people's eyes, that things aren't as simple as they've been explained to people.

Allison Ferns:

Yeah, can you believe it? This year sees 20 years since the 9/11 terror attacks.

Unidentified Speaker:

This just in, that is the World Trade Center.

Unidentified Speaker:

Apparently a plane has crashed into the World Trade Center, New York.

Unidentified Speaker:

Oh my God.

Unidentified Speaker:

Oh my God.

Unidentified Speaker:

That looks like a second plane.

Unidentified Speaker:

That just exploded.

Allison Ferns:

It still makes me shiver when you hear that audio, because I think all of us probably remember where we were when that happened. In fact, you can let me know your memories of that fateful day this morning. You can text 81333, start your message with the word radio. Today, we're going to be hearing how one Sussex family who lost a loved one on 9/11 are still seeking answers.

Matt Campbell:

You're never really going to get to know the entire truth about 9/11, but I do hope that this action through the inquest will start to open people's eyes, that things aren't as simple as they've been explained to people.

Allison Ferns:

Well, that's Matt Campbell from Hurstpierpoint, who I went to meet a couple of weeks ago. His brother Geoff died in the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center in New York, back in 2001. Thirty-one-year old Geoff perished in the North Tower, leaving behind a devastated fiancee in America and a grieving family in Sussex. But they have never accepted official accounts of the disaster. They believe controlled explosives, and not aircraft, brought the building down.

Unidentified Speaker:

Only one tower is standing, the other has collapsed.

Unidentified Speaker:

We can see a billowing smoke rising. I'll tell you that I can't see that second tower.

Unidentified Speaker:

This building has collapsed.

Unidentified Speaker:

Big bang, and then we saw smoke coming out, and everybody started running out. We saw the plane on the other side of the building, and there was smoke everywhere, and people are jumping out the windows. Over there, they're jumping out the windows.

Unidentified Speaker:

Being covered by soot and ash, so it looks almost like, no. People are coming up the street, running from the scene of this new explosion.

Allison Ferns:

And 20 years on, it's still so difficult to listen to. Well now, Matt and his family want the Attorney General to order a new inquest into Geoff's death, in the hope that they will finally get the truth about what happened. Well, I've been to Hurstpierpoint, as I say, to speak to Matt Campbell, and he began our conversation by recalling that fateful day, when he heard the news whilst on holiday in Lanzarote.

Matt Campbell:

We were in this hotel, which had like really sort of poor quality cable TV.

Allison Ferns:

Yeah.

Matt Campbell:

I think we just had one news channel that was in English, and it was hard to find out what was going on. Obviously there was lots of frantic phone calls, both with my brother and my dad and Caroline. It wasn't really until we got back to the UK on Thursday, so two days later, did we kind of get more of the BBC style news and obviously papers and stuff. We were kind of spared. We didn't really see the endless repeated loops of the plane going in to it.

Allison Ferns:

Yeah.

Matt Campbell:

I think what was televised the first day.

Allison Ferns:

Caroline, the stuff I've read suggests that she kind of started searching hospitals and what have you.

Matt Campbell:

We went out there about five days after, and I think she'd been calling or going round to hospitals. We did the same. So when we arrived, I think on the Saturday, the very next day, the morning, we called hospitals, and I remember going down to one hospital, and at that point it was very clear that he wasn't sitting in a hospital somewhere in a coma or something. She had obviously spent time. She put a lot of the missing persons posters that I think everyone remembers seeing these huge walls, just filled with desperate relatives, saying "have you seen this person?" And photos, giving all their details, where they were, etc.

Allison Ferns:

And now as a family, you're asking the Attorney General to reopen the inquest. Why?

Matt Campbell:

For me, the circumstances surrounding my brother's death, there's lots of things that don't sit right. I've been frustrated over the years, particularly the last decade, trying to get some straight answers and even just fundamental evidence from the authorities, whether it be through freedom of information requests or contact with the FBI, counter terrorism in the UK, the Met, etc. It's fairly obvious. If you actually look at how the towers came down, and there's a great video by David Chandler called the North Tower Exploding, the tower is being demolished in front of your eyes, and a lot of people who reported on it that day spoke in those ways. They thought it was bombs. They thought the towers had been destructed, destroyed.

Allison Ferns:

So you think there were explosives in the buildings?

Matt Campbell:

Yes. It's not too far-fetched. There was an attempt in 1993 to bring down the towers. Ramzi Yousef was imprisoned for his role as being the chief architect. He's the nephew of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, who's in Guantanamo Bay accused of being the chief architect. It's always been their intention to bring down those towers. I'm not saying it was them, but as I said, the evidence that's there, you've got explosives, residues in the dust. You've got numerous, I think it's over 150 eye witnesses, first responders, who are reporting explosions, bombs, etc,, all of which was ignored by the authorities when they did their report.

Allison Ferns:

The way I understood it, the towers fell, according to official reports, because the girders melted because of the aviation fuel.

Matt Campbell:

They certainly didn't melt because of the fires. They can be weakened through fire, but they can't reach temperatures high enough to actually melt the steel. NIST, which is the body tasked with investigating the collapse of the towers, didn't actually go as far as explaining how the towers came down. The reports that have been put forward to me, they were trying to fit it and frame it around a certain narrative. They never once investigated or looked into the fact that explosives could have been used.

There's an organization called Architects & Engineers for 9/11 Truth. There's over 3,000 qualified people have looked at the evidence, and they know that towers aren't supposed to come down like they did due to fire. There's a study on the third tower that came down that day, building seven, by the University of Alaska Fairbanks. There's a four-year study that categorically proves that that building, which again the authorities said came down because of fire, couldn't possibly have come down by fire. It actually fell at free fall acceleration, two and a quarter seconds. You can't do that unless there's zero structural support. The only way that happens is through the use of explosives.

Allison Ferns:

It obviously sounds, Matt, like you've done extensive research over the past 20 years, but do you worry that some people will dismiss what you say and sort of just say, "Oh, we've heard all these conspiracy theories before."

Matt Campbell:

Say that to the families of Bloody Sunday. Say that to the families of Hillsborough. It's always the family members that dig the deepest and have to fight to get some sort of justice.

Allison Ferns:

If there has been a cover-up, it would be a cover-up on a mass scale. Is it feasible to think that that many people could keep that secret?

Matt Campbell:

There's definitely an ongoing cover-up in all aspects of 9/11. My father's involved in a lawsuit against Saudi Arabia, and their state sponsored support of 9/11. I'm still struggling to get hold of 16,000 pages to do with an investigation into Saudi involvement, again, being withheld by the FBI. It's incredibly hard. That's why for me, the only way to put the people who just say, "It's a conspiracy theory" etc., to rest is to actually get this stuff in court.

Allison Ferns:

That must be incredibly hard. To lose your brother under any circumstances is a tragedy, particularly as you say, he was so young and he had his whole life ahead of him. But to almost then have to live for the past 20 years with these unanswered questions, has that added to your grief?

Matt Campbell:

Yeah. I was very depressed for about a decade, and frustration. It's like, if it's such a done and dusted deal, why am I still struggling to get hold of what should be really publicly available evidence? You're never really going to get to know the entire truth about 9/11. But I do hope that this action through the inquest will start to open people's eyes that things aren't as simple as they've been explained to people.

Allison Ferns:

What would you like to happen now?

Matt Campbell:

I'd like the Attorney General to grant his authority to push the application up to the High Court and then for the High Court to quash my brother's initial inquest, and to instruct a coroner's court to have a fresh inquest and to look at the vast evidence that we've assembled that was never considered at my brother's first inquest. Obviously ultimately, to change the verdict. The big question is, is it in the interest of justice? Well, yeah, I think so. A lot of wars were fought off the back of that, and there's still military presence. For me, yeah, my brother deserved justice. I don't know. I'd hope he'd be proud of what I've been trying to do.

Allison Ferns:

I think that's the thing as well, to lose somebody you love in such a public way. And of course now with the 20th anniversary year, it's going to be everywhere, which is going to be really tough for you and your family.

Matt Campbell:

Yeah, it was always going to be a big year. And I think also with the inquest, there's probably more interest, which is no bad thing.

Allison Ferns:

Have you come up against criticism? Have people kind of dismissed you as some crazy conspiracy theorist?

Matt Campbell:

Oh yeah, sure. Had lots of angry discussions in pubs with certain people, who just refuse to look at certain bits of evidence. I'm just saying, "Well, go and have a look." I don't have that anger anymore. I tend to just walk away if the discussions get a bit heated. The more we look, the more things don't make sense.

Allison Ferns:

Well that was Matt Campbell from Hurstpierpoint talking to me about the tragic loss of his brother, who perished in the 9/11 twin towers attacks 20 years ago. Now, it's important to stress that those views expressed in Matt's interview are his views. There have been many questions raised about 9/11, but it's important to point out that the official U.S. Government reports have categorically stated that it was fires that caused the World Trade Center to collapse, and not controlled explosives as the Campbell family believe. The NIST, The National Institute of Standards and Technology in America, carried out a three-year comprehensive building and fire safety investigation in 2002, issuing their findings in a final report published in October 2005. This is what their Lead Technical Investigator Shyam Sunder said in that report.

Shyam Sunder:

World Trade Center 7 collapsed because of fires. In fact, we have shown for the first time that fire can induce a progressive collapse.

NIST Narrator:

NIST use detailed data, describing the building and its contents, to create the most complex computer simulation of a structure collapse ever made. Falling debris from tower one started fires on 10 floors in building seven. A break in the city water main from the collapse of the towers, disabled sprinklers in the lower half of WTC seven, allowing fires on those floors to burn for seven hours. The NIST computer model was validated with evidence from videos, photos, witness accounts, and other data. It shows that heat from fires expanded long support beams, causing connections and floors to fail.

Shyam Sunder:

So you look at the floor's failing here, and eventually this column 79 is going to buckle. It fails and then the entire vertical progression takes place.

NIST Narrator:

The buckled column caused additional collapsed floors and falling debris that removed support from adjacent interior columns. A chain reaction then caused other interior columns to fail in quick succession. The outside shell of the building fell. The NIST team found no evidence that explosives were involved in the collapse.

Shyam Sunder:

And our analysis show that even the smallest explosive charge that was capable of bringing down the critical column in the building. Had it occurred, we would have seen sound levels of 120 to 130 decibels, about a half a mile away. That would have been an incredibly loud sound, and that sound was not picked up by any of the videos or witnesses that we have talked to.

Allison Ferns:

Well after 8 o'clock, I'll be speaking to Ian Henshall from Hove, who runs the Re-investigate 9/11 campaign group in the UK and who has written extensively about the Twin towers attack. He'll tell us more about the evidence he thinks supports the Campbells' claims.


Second Segment

Allison Ferns:

Eight minutes past 8, and as I was saying, our top story, the Sussex family who say official accounts of the 9/11 terror attacks, in their mind, simply don't add up.

Matt Campbell:

The reports that have been brought forward to me, they were trying to fit it and frame it around a certain narrative. They never once investigated or looked into the fact that explosives could have been used.

Allison Ferns:

Yeah. That's Matt Campbell from Hurstpierpoint. He tragically lost his brother, Geoff in the September 11th twin tower attacks in New York. The 31-year old was trapped on the 106th floor of the North Tower when hijacked aircraft were flown into the building.

Unidentified Speaker:

This just in, that is the World Trade Center.

Unidentified Speaker:

Apparently a plane has crashed into the World Trade Center, New York.

Unidentified Speaker:

Oh my God.

Unidentified Speaker:

Oh my God.

Unidentified Speaker:

That looks like a second plane.

Unidentified Speaker:

That just exploded.

Allison Ferns:

Just listening to that archive audio just brings you back to where you were, doesn't it, on that fateful day. In fact, you can tell me where you were when you watched that happen. Text 81333, start your message with the word radio. Now, as we know, the official account is that the Twin Towers were brought down by raging fires caused by leaking jet fuel, which melted the supporting metal girders. But the Campbell's believe they have a dossier of evidence that shows it was in fact controlled explosives, and not aircraft, that brought those buildings down. Well, we will hear more from Matt shortly, but I do want to stress that this is their opinion. This isn't about us giving weight to conspiracy theories. This is more about us hearing the story of a family who have, in their mind, unanswered questions about the death of a loved one.

The American National Institute of Standards and Technology carried out a three-year comprehensive building and fire safety investigation in 2002. They issued their findings and a final report published in October 2005. This is what their Lead Technical Investigator, Shyam Sunder, said in that report.

NIST Narrator:

The NIST team found no evidence that explosives were involved in the collapse.

Shyam Sunder:

And our analysis show that even the smallest explosive charge that was capable of bringing down the critical column in the building. Had it occurred, we would have seen sound levels of 120 to 130 decibels, about a half a mile away. That would have been an incredibly loud sound, and that sound was not picked up by any of the videos or witnesses that we have talked to.

Allison Ferns:

Well, in a moment, I'll be speaking to Ian Henshall from Hove who runs Re-investigate 9/11, a campaign group set up to challenge the official version of what happened. But first, let's hear more from Matt Campbell. He talked to me about his memories of his brother and his 20-year quest to find answers.

Matt Campbell:

It's hard to deal with any sort of loss, I guess. It's just the fact that 9/11 has always been in the public eye. References all the time in films, and papers, and magazines and stuff. I'd say the passing of time has made it easier to some extent, but yeah, we still miss him.

Allison Ferns:

Yeah. What was Geoff like?

Matt Campbell:

Oh, he was good looking, funny, intelligent, articulate. He was just a really good laugh. We had a lot of fun, only a year between us. He was just getting going in life. He'd just got engaged a few weeks before 9/11, and he had his whole life ahead of him.

Allison Ferns:

And the cruelest thing is that he didn't actually work at the Twin Towers, did he? He was just there at a conference.

Matt Campbell:

That's right. He normally worked up in Midtown. He worked for Reuters, and he was only there to attend the conference, bit of networking really. Shouldn't have really been there.

Allison Ferns:

Gosh. What do you know about where he was when it happened?

Matt Campbell:

Well, he was due to attend this conference set on the 106th floor of the North Tower. We know he was running a bit late that morning. He sent me an email about 8:02 saying he was running late for the conference.

Allison Ferns:

You mentioned his fiancee. They'd only got engaged, and it was three weeks prior. How is Caroline? It's hard to imagine how you ever get over something like that. You don't, I guess.

Matt Campbell:

I think Caroline's found it really hard. She still lives in the flat that Geoff bought. That's obviously filled with memories and stuff.

Allison Ferns:

And now as a family, you're asking the Attorney General to reopen the inquest. Why?

Matt Campbell:

For me, the circumstances surrounding my brother's death, there's lots of things that don't sit right. If you actually look at how the towers came down, and there's a great video by David Chandler called the North Tower Exploding. The tower is being demolished in front of your eyes, and a lot of people who reported on it that day spoke in those ways. They thought it was bombs. They thought the towers had been destructed, destroyed.

Allison Ferns:

So you think there were explosives in the building?

Matt Campbell:

Yes. The evidence that's there, this is, you've got explosives, residues in the dust. You've got numerous, I mean over 150 eye witnesses, first responders, who are reporting explosions, bombs, etc., all of which was ignored. The reports that have been put forward, to me, they were trying to fit it and frame it around a certain narrative. They never once investigated or looked into the fact that explosives could have been used.

Allison Ferns:

It obviously sounds, Matt, like you've done extensive research over the past 20 years, but do you worry that some people will dismiss what you say and sort of say, "Oh, we've heard all these conspiracy theories before."

Matt Campbell:

Say that to the families of Bloody Sunday. Say that to the families of Hillsborough. It's always the family members that dig the deepest and have to fight to get some sort of justice.

Allison Ferns:

Matt Campbell there from Hurstpierpoint. Joining me now on the line is Ian Henshall from Hove. Ian runs Re-investigate 9/11, a campaign group set up to challenge the official version of what happened. He's also the author of 9/11 Revealed and the 2007 follow-up 9/11: The New Evidence. Morning to you, Ian.

Ian Henshall:

Morning, Allison. Thanks for having me on.

Allison Ferns:

It was really interesting when I sat down with Matt Campbell and heard his story, because I think a lot of us have heard these conspiracy theories before. I'll be honest with you, I've had a text from somebody today saying, "Why as a radio station are you giving weight to these theories?" It's difficult, isn't it? Because at the heart of this, you've got a family who've lost a loved one, and they are seeking what they feel are unanswered questions.

Ian Henshall:

Yeah. As you hear somebody use the phrase conspiracy theory, you sort of know where they're coming from. They support the official line. Then in some cases, like your correspondent, they even try to have alternative views suppressed. And of course, conspiracy theory is a very good phrase for suppressing alternative views. It can mean anything. Some conspiracy theories are crazy, some aren't. Of course the worst conspiracy theories are the ones which are created by governments, particularly the Nazi governments in Germany. That was a government backed conspiracy theory, that Jews were to blame for all Germany's woes.

So, it's much more complicated, but that's the thing that you really notice when you study 9/11 just how complicated this is and how enormous the evidence field is. There's a huge amount of paper trail evidence from FBI officers, which I can tell you about if we've got time. The head of counter terrorism, the head of terrorism in the White House at the time, has now spoken out, Richard Clarke. He believes the hijackers were being protected by the CIA as part of a undercover operation and that the 9/11 attacks of course wouldn't have happened if the terrorists had been arrested.

Allison Ferns:

To think though there could have been a cover-up, it had to have been on a mass scale. I suppose my thought is, is it feasible that you could have that many people keep a secret? Surely the truth would have come out by now, 20 years on?

Ian Henshall:

Well, it sort of has. For instance, the University of Alaska did a study on the collapse of the third building that collapsed on 9/11, because there were actually three big buildings that collapsed, not just two. His name's Leroy Hulsey. They've done a proper investigation with computer models, and they say that their models are better than the NIST models, but they've come to the very clear conclusion that the third building couldn't have been, based on their models, which of course could be wrong.

But to dismiss all this sort of thing as conspiracy theory, it's not just insulting to the families, it's also insulting to all the other victims of 9/11 in Afghanistan, because 9/11 triggered 20 years of war. That's why I think it's still legitimate to talk about it now. Those wars aren't really abating. They're leaving Afghanistan officially this autumn, but there's still going to be mercenaries and contractors there. Syria's still going on. All over central Africa, you've got these conflicts with Al-Qaeda type groups. Unfortunately it's still all very relevant today.

Allison Ferns:

The Campbell family are now calling for a new inquest into the death of Geoff. Do you think the Attorney General will rule in their favor?

Ian Henshall:

Well, all you can say is that the Attorney General will be operating as a law officer, not as a politician. And we don't know what's going to be going on in their mind, so we can just hope that they will continue to, as they should, act as a lawyer and recognize that there is many reasons for doubting the original inquest verdict.

Allison Ferns:

When I spoke to Matt, he said that he does often get criticized for being some sort of crazy conspiracy theorist. Obviously having written the books you have, the campaign group you run, do you come up against a lot of that as well?

Ian Henshall:

It's more in the background, like your caller who called in. I don't often appear in the mainstream media, talk radio maybe, but that's about it. The others don't seem to want me. My first book was actually serialized in the Daily Mail. They gave it three pages, and nobody anywhere in the mainstream media took it up then the following week, which as you'll know as a media professional, that's really unusual. So no, I don't get called a conspiracy theorist. I wouldn't really care if I did, because it's such a meaningless… it says more about the person using the phrase really than it does about anything else.

Allison Ferns:

One of the things that someone has gotten in touch with me today and said is that, they understand that this is a family who are grieving, and is this a case where when people have lost a loved one, it is so hard to get your head around it, particularly when we're talking about events that were so horrific as 9/11 were, that actually, it's quite a normal reaction to grief, to try and find a different narrative.

Ian Henshall:

Well, everybody is different. We all react differently to things, but I think usually there's an enormous pressure on people to accept the official narrative. They're in a state of shock, tragedy. The last thing anybody wants to think is that they haven't been told the truth. So I think that's one reason why we haven't had more complaints from victim's families. But there is a huge lawsuit going on in America, directed at the Saudi government. And of course the Saudis denied the allegations, but there's a lot of family members who were very unhappy about the failure to investigate 9/11. In fact just recently, Trump promised, more fool his supporters, but a lot of people believed his promises, that he was going to open the books on 9/11, and it's yet another of the broken promises from the Trump administration, which have upset people.

Allison Ferns:

It's fascinating. Thank you so much for joining us, Ian. Ian Henshall from Hove. Ian runs Re-investigate 9/11, a campaign group set up to challenge the official version of what happened. He's also the author of a couple of books on the subject as well, 9/11 Revealed, and 9/11: The New Evidence. There obviously have been many questions raised about 9/11, but I do feel it's really important to stress that the official US government reports have categorically stated that it was fires that caused the World Trade Center to collapse, and not controlled explosives as the Campbell family believe. If you want to get in touch and let me know where you were on that fateful day, please do. You can text me, 81333. Start your message with the word radio.


Third Segment

Allison Ferns:

Got some Gary Kemp on the way, but first back to our top story. On today's show, we've been taking you back 20 years. Yes. 20 years to the 9/11 terror attacks in New York.

Unidentified Speaker:

This just in, that is the World Trade Center.

Unidentified Speaker:

Apparently a plane has crashed into the World Trade Center, New York.

Unidentified Speaker:

Oh my God.

Unidentified Speaker:

Oh my God.

Unidentified Speaker:

That looks like a second plane.

Unidentified Speaker:

That just exploded.

Allison Ferns:

We've been hearing how 20 years on, one Sussex family are still seeking answers.

Matt Campbell:

You're never really going to get to know the entire truth about 9/11, but I do hope that this action through the inquest will start to open people's eyes, that things aren't as simple as they've been explained to people.

Allison Ferns:

That's Matt Campbell from Hurstpierpoint, whose brother Geoff died in the September 11th attacks on the World Trade Center. He perished in the North Tower, leaving behind a devastated fiancee in America, and a grieving family in Sussex. They've never accepted official accounts of the disaster, believing controlled explosives, and not aircraft, brought the building down.

Matt Campbell:

The reports that have been put forward, they were trying to fit it and frame it around a certain narrative. They never once investigated or looked into the fact that explosives could have been used.

Allison Ferns:

They want the Attorney General to order a new inquest and will begin legal action to do so very shortly. I really must stress though, that this is their opinion, their views, and it does go against official versions of what took place. For instance, the American National Institute of Standards and Technology carried out a three-year comprehensive building and fire safety investigation in 2002, issuing their findings in a final report published in October 2005. This is what their Lead Technical Investigator Shyam Sunder said in that report.

NIST Narrator:

The NIST team found no evidence that explosives were involved in the collapse.

Shyam Sunder:

And our analysis show that even the smallest explosive charge that was capable of bringing down the critical column in the building. Had it occurred, we would have seen sound levels of 120 to 130 decibels, about a half a mile away. That would have been an incredibly loud sound, and that sound was not picked up by any of the videos or witnesses that we have talked to.

Allison Ferns:

Well, I've been to Hurstpierpoint to speak to Matt Campbell, and he began our conversation by recalling that fateful day, when he heard the news whilst on holiday in Lanzarote.

Matt Campbell:

It's hard to deal with any sort of loss, I guess. It's just the fact that 9/11 has always been in the public eye. References all the time in films, and papers, and magazines and stuff. I'd say the passing of time has made it easier to some extent, but yeah, we still miss him.

Allison Ferns:

Yeah. What was Geoff like?

Matt Campbell:

Oh, he was good looking, funny, intelligent, articulate. He was just a really good laugh. We had a lot of fun, only a year between us. He was just getting going in life. He'd just got engaged a few weeks before 9/11, and he had his whole life ahead of him.

Allison Ferns:

And the cruelest thing is that he didn't actually work at the Twin Towers, did he? He was just there at a conference.

Matt Campbell:

That's right. He normally worked up in Midtown. He worked for Reuters, and he was only there to attend the conference, bit of networking really. Shouldn't have really been there.

Allison Ferns:

Gosh. What do you know about where he was when it happened?

Matt Campbell:

Well, he was due to attend this conference set on the 106th floor of the North Tower. We know he was running a bit late that morning. He sent me an email about 8:02 saying he was running late for the conference.

Allison Ferns:

You mentioned his fiancee. They'd only got engaged, and it was three weeks prior. How is Caroline? It's hard to imagine how you ever get over something like that. You don't, I guess.

Matt Campbell:

I think Caroline's found it really hard. She still lives in the flat that Geoff bought. That's obviously filled with memories and stuff.

Allison Ferns:

And now as a family, you're asking the Attorney General to reopen the inquest. Why?

Matt Campbell:

For me, the circumstances surrounding my brother's death, there's lots of things that don't sit right. If you actually look at how the towers came down, and there's a great video by David Chandler called the North Tower Exploding. The tower is being demolished in front of your eyes, and a lot of people who reported on it that day spoke in those ways. They thought it was bombs. They thought the towers had been destructed, destroyed.

Allison Ferns:

So you think there were explosives in the building?

Matt Campbell:

Yes. The evidence that's there, you've got explosives, residues in the dust. You've got numerous, I think it's over 150 eye witnesses, first responders, who are reporting explosions, bombs, et cetera, all of which was ignored. The reports that have been put forward to me, they were trying to fit it and frame it around a certain narrative. They never once investigated or looked into the fact that explosives could have been used.

Allison Ferns:

It obviously sounds, Matt, like you've done extensive research over the past 20 years, but do you worry that some people will dismiss what you say and sort of just say, "Oh, we've heard all these conspiracy theories before.

Matt Campbell:

Say that to the families of Bloody Sunday. That's the families of Hillsborough. It's always the family members that dig the deepest and have to fight to get some sort of justice.

Allison Ferns:

Matt Campbell there from Hurstpierpoint who tragically lost his brother Geoff in the 9/11 terror attacks. Now it is important to point out that the official U.S government reports have categorically stated that it was fires that caused the World Trade Center to collapse and not controlled explosives as the Campbell family believe.